A SURVEY ON THE STATUS OF THE LOCAL LANGUAGES OF PULAU SIMEULUE AND PULAU BANYAK AND THEIR USE WITHIN THE COMMUNITY

Zulfadli A. Aziz, Robert Amery

Abstract


Within Aceh, the languages of Pulau Simeulue and Pulau Banyak are very different to those spoken elsewhere in the province. These languages appear to be the most endangered with relatively low numbers of speakers. This project investigates the status of the languages spoken in Pulau Simeulue and Pulau Banyak, Aceh Indonesia, and their use in the community. In addition to observation in the field, questionnaires were distributed to native speakers of Devayan, Sigulai, and Leukon in Pulau Simeulue, and Haloban in Pulau Banyak. The results of this study show that Devayan has the most speakers (possibly 30,000 or more), whilst Sigulai has somewhat less (perhaps 20,000).Leukon is spoken only in two villages (Lafakha with 687 inhabitants and Langi with a similar number), though language loyalty appears to be particularly strong amongst Sigulai and Leukon speakers. Haloban is spoken in villages on the largest island located in the more remote Kecamatan of Pulau Banyak Barat. Haloban speakers reside in two adjoining villages, Haloban and Asantola. Haloban is in a considerably weakened position.


Keywords


Pulau Simeulue and Pulau Banyak languages; Sigulai; Devayan; Haloban; language loyalty; language shift

Full Text:

PDF

References


Ajzen, I. (2005). Attitude, personality and behavior (2nd Edition). Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Al Awwal, T. M. R. (2011). The reluctance of Acehnese youth to use Acehnese in their group. (Unpublished Bachelor’s thesis). Universitas Syiah Kuala, Banda Aceh.

Alamsyah, T., Taib, R., Azwardi, & Idham, M. (2011). Pemilihan Bahasa Indonesia sebagai bahasa pertama anak dalam keluarga masyarakat Aceh penutur Bahasa Aceh di Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam [Choosing Indonesian as the children’s first language in the family of Acehnese community who are Acehnese native speakers in Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam]. Jurnal Pendidikan Bahasa Melayu [Malay Language Journal Education], 1(2), 31-34.

Aziz, Z. A. & Amery, R. (2016) The effects of a linguistic tsunami on the languages of Aceh. Studies in English Language and Education, 3(2), 103-111.

Baker, C. (1992). Attitudes and language. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

Beck, D., & Lam, Y. (2006). Language loss and linguistic suicide: A case study from the Sierra Norte de Puebla, Mexico. Alberta: University of Alberta.

Carranza, M. A. (1982). Attitudinal research on Hispanic language varieties. In E. B. Ryan, & H. Giles (Eds.), Attitudes towards language variation. Social and applied contexts (pp. 63-83). London: Edward Arnold Publishers Ltd.

Daly, P. (2015) The aftermath of aid: Assessing safety and sustainability in Aceh, Indonesia a decade after the 2004 tsunami. Keynote address delivered at the Annual International Conference 2015. September 9, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Indonesia.

DeSwaan, A. (2004). Endangered languages, sociolinguistics, and linguistic sentimentalism. European Review, 12(4), 567–580.

Doyle, R. (1998). Language disappearing and dead. Scientific American, 278(3), 26.

Pendakur, R. (1990). Speaking in tongues: Heritage language maintenance and transfer in Canada. Ottawa, O. N.: Policy and Research, Multiculturalism Sector.

Szecsy, E. M. (2008). Attitudes towards language diversity. In the Encyclopedia of Bilingual Education. Retrieved from http://sage-ereference.com/view/bilingual/ n20.xml#p47


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.